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Facts & Figures

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Facts & Figures

  • 89% of batteries are for general use and can be found in every room in the house.
  • You can tell your batteries are running low or used up by:
    Testing them in a torch or clock
    Using a battery tester
  • A battery is measured in units of power called "Watts". It was named to honor James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine.
  • "Solar" is the Latin word for "Sun" and is a powerful source of energy.
  • Solar energy is better for the environment than traditional forms of energy.
  • Solar energy has many uses such as: generating electricity, heating water, drying clothes, heating, and cooling buildings.
  • Solar energy can also be used to heat swimming pools, calculators, and other small appliances. It produces lighting for indoors and outdoors.
  • You can even cook food with solar energy.
  • Solar energy can also power cars, meaning cars get their fuel from the sun.
  • The Italian inventor Alessandro Volta invented the first battery in 1799. Volta's battery was called a pile-a messy stack of disks made of two types of metal. The discs were separated from each other by pieces of cloth soaked in salt water. The chemical reaction between the different metals and the salt water generated electricity. Volta gave his name to the unit of electromotive force, the "volt."
  • Did you know that consumers spend $10.7 billion on batteries annually in the US alone?
  • Did you know that you can make a battery from fruit and two coins? The acid in the fruit reacts with water to create hydrogen. The hydrogen is in the form of ions, which are positively charged atoms that are missing electrons. This enables the acid to take electrons from a metal. In a battery, the acid takes electrons from one metal and brings them to a different metal, so an electrical charge-or voltage-is built up. The fruit with the highest acidity will generate the highest voltage.
  • The smallest battery in the world measures 2.9 mm in diameter and 13 mm in length. Recharging the battery is done wirelessly by an external electrical field, which is of great benefit since these batteries are designed to stimulate damaged nerves and muscles inside the human body.
  • The biggest battery in the world provides 40 megawatts of power - enough electricity for 12,000 people - for up to seven minutes.
  • If left unused in a product for an extended period, batteries can leak and ruin expensive products.